Brain tumour symptoms – tingling in the extremities and nausea as cases rise by 50%

Brain tumour symptoms – tingling in the extremities and nausea as cases rise by 50%

A brain tumour is a growth of cells in the brain that multiplies in an abnormal, uncontrollable way.

All cancers begin in cells.

“Our bodies are made up of more than a hundred million million (100,000,000,000,000) cells,” says Cancer Research UK.

“Cancer starts with changes in one cell or a small group of cells.”

There are over 130 different types of brain tumours.

Tumours can start in any part of the brain or spinal cord and are usually named after the type of cell they develop from.

A new study reveals how those suffering with cancer has shot up in the last 20 years.

The number of people being diagnosed with a brain tumour in England has risen by over 50% in the last two decades (2001-2019), according to an analysis of NHS cancer incidence data.

The figures are from a 2021 study by King’s College researchers and are a stark warning about the UK’s leading cancer killer of children and adults under the age of 40.

While the disease remains relatively rare overall, the number of people being diagnosed with a brain tumour rose from 6,577 in 2001 to 9,960 in 2019, with the age-standardised incidence rate increasing 14.8 to 18.3 cases per 100,000 population (an increase of 24%).

Experts believe the increase in cases could be explained by the ageing of the population and advances in detection and clinical practice – including the adoption of new diagnostic and imaging tools, molecular testing, new surgical techniques and improved classification and data collection.

Spotting brain tumours is a difficult task for medical professionals.

The symptoms of the devastating condition can be vague and confused with other health issues.

For example, persistent headaches and coordination problems are two common brain tumour symptoms.

Also, GPs investigating suspected brain tumours have no proper screening tools to decide who gets further brain scans.

While reassuring the public that brain tumours remain relatively rare, The Brain Tumour Charity called for greater awareness of the potential signs and symptoms of the disease as it today launched its new campaign, “Better Safe than Tumour”.

The campaign aims to support the public – whether adults, children, parents, partners or friends – to be aware of the possible signs and symptoms and to get any concerning or persistent symptoms checked out by a doctor.

Better Safe than Tumour builds on the success of The Charity’s prior initiative in paediatric brain tumours, HeadSmart, which launched in 2009 in partnership with the Royal College of Paediatric and Child Health and the University of Nottingham, to raise awareness of the signs and symptoms in children and teenagers.

Early brain cancer symptoms in adults

  • Persistent or severe headaches, which may be worse in the morning
  • Changes to vision, including blurred or double vision and abnormal eye movements
  • Seizures or fits
  • Balance problems or dizziness
  • Memory problems
  • Nausea or persistent vomiting, especially when not accompanied by diarrhoea or a high temperature
  • Speech difficulties
  • Persistent tiredness or fatigue
  • Numbness or tingling in extremities
  • Loss of taste and smell.

Early brain cancer symptoms in children

  • Persistent or severe headaches, which may be worse in the morning
  • Changes to vision, including blurred or double vision and abnormal eye movements
  • Seizures or fits
  • Balance, co-ordination or walking problems
  • Abnormal head position
  • Nausea and dizziness
  • Tiredness
  • Loss of taste and smell
  • Diabetes insipidus, including excessive thirst and needing to urinate more frequently
  • Reduced consciousness.

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